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I told Galvin about my expectations around Apple, Inc. and it’s stocks potential, and why. And, he told the world. I’ll remind you of that by pointing you to:  not what you were thinking.

What did you do?

Then I gave you, all of you, fair (fair) warning with: how Verizon might spank Android.

Now, with the publishing of the story: Could Apple Hit $1,000?, in the venerable Wall Street Journal yesterday, it’s a reasonable bet, the market will drive you and Apple stock towards $1000.

What are you going to do, now?

Come on! Do it!

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork


Estimates vary widely but some credible sources think we could run out of new IP addresses as early as this February.

Go ahead and try to sleep now. I dare you.

Historically, every gizmo – PC, networked printer, IP telephone – that communicates with other gizmos over a computer network has been assigned its own, unique number (something like 172.17.60.22) called an IP address.  That identifying number is how the InterWeb knows to display this blog post on your laptop, and not on your colleague’s iPad.

Don’t panic.  This does not mean that your iPhone will stop accepting texts sometime late this winter or that you won’t be able to buy any more shiny Internet-enabled gadgets.  Network engineers are smart folk and they have foreseen this inevitability for years.  In fact, the new addressing protocol, called IPv6 (don’t ask about IPv5) was standardized way back in 1998 and allows for 2128 addresses.  That’s an unimaginably big number.  In fact, it’s enough to assign a unique Internet address to every single atom on the planet according to this web site, which provides some other amusing comparisons.

Heads-up… Keep an eye out for what Bob Twitchell and hearty and ferocious band of engineers are doing over at Dispersive Network Technologies. Sharzing is naught less than bad-ass, and wicked-cool.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

The fact is most opportunities are not corollary to the obvious.

Ten years will come-and-go quickly. It already has, and it will do so, again. And, along the way, Apple’s stock could well hit one thousand dollars ($1,000.00). You can take my word for it. But, here is additional insight.

As Galvin makes his case, Apple’s revenues may triple in the next ten years. So, the stock could indeed hit $1000. But, the real play is not so obvious, and will likely be in the form of fiber optics – because that is what is needed to pipe the content. But, Data Centers will have their role as well. And, dudes like Bob Twitchell (big smarty pants genius that he is) will help lead the way with emerging technology that makes relative technology faster, more secure, and less costly.

Reactionary investment strategy like reading news briefs off MSN and Yahoo! will kill you. Whereas proactive research will build wealth. So… read between the lines from cross-referenced information. Think in terms of convergence. For example, “Apple”, “Video Anywhere”, “Fiber Optics”, “Data Centers”, and “Venture Capital”.

Follow the money BEFORE the thundering herds sort it out.

It’s about foundational thinking and strategy – relative technologies that make for great strategic partnerships. One element of the formula building off of another.

Now you owe me.

Soon… More insight into being a physical bad-ass at fifty, and great Margarita tips.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

Christmas has come-and-gone. However, what remains are on-going decisions relative to technology acquisitions.

Is it a new computer, or the iPad?

That’s simply short-term thinking around new toys.

However, here, yes right here, is is your peek into the reality relative to what’s to come (this will be affecting trends, and the stock market)…

At some point, workers – such as journalists and accountants, will remain tethered to PC’s (the generic terms for desktop or laptop computers) because they create some and various forms of information, while decision makers – like executives, will primarily use mobile technology represented by iPads and Tablets because they mostly care about information, and the leveraging of it (they use information).

So… who’s leading this trend? Follow the money. Then think in terms of convergence.

Soon… Look for my continued thinking around “video anywhere”, “Apple”, “Fiber”, “Data Centers”, and “Venture Capital”.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

So… I don’t know how many of you use LinkedIN. As it turns out, I do. And, we average two new clients a month that we can directly attribute to the business network. So, I’ll take the position it’s worth the fifty dollars we pay for the extra inMail capability.

Recently I was looking for a Subject Matter Expert (“SME”), and I found a good one on LinkedIN. But, my inMail went unanswered for several weeks until his wife, who was rummaging around on his laptop, and just happened to stumble upon the link herself, advised me that her husband was deceased. That all struck me as a bit creepy. So… It’s rather unsettling to realize that, over the course of time, more and more profiles will be a lingering memory of people that are deceased. So… You can really see dead people on LinkedIN.

In the cases of the lonely or unattached, who would know to remove the profile? Who will police that?

By the way… I was meeting with a gen-something (who really cares?) upon the request of a friend (it was his son). The young lad was twenty three and a recent graduate of Georgia. He confidently advised me that he was a social media expert (seriously). When I inquired about business context, he actually waved me off and told me that did not matter in business these days. I almost gagged on the irony (and, didn’t even need a spoon).

…oh… And, he told me LinkedIN is dead.

…he’s also unemployed, with few prospects.

…which reminds me… It’s amaz­ing how the only day most people use LinkedIN is the day they lose a job.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

Readers know that I’ve set aside my beloved Apple-oriented hardware (iMacs, Powerbooks, and iPhone) and have been working enthusiastically to drop the Android Operating system onto desktops. Never mind it’s already being done on a few laptops, and now tablets. I wanted a fast-starting and nimble desktop with a LARGE screen. So, being me, I set forth to make it so.

Along the way I started experimenting with different Operating Systems like Windows 7 and the Linux-leading Ubuntu (the truest form of Open Source that also works for the non-geek community).

All of this necessitated a broadening investigation into numerous applications for productivity and peripherals.

Apple was (well… is) great with everything wonderfully integrated in terms of how all your computers, iPhone, iPad, and iPod(s) can sync flawlessly (more on that in just a moment). But, I had already had to start using MissingSync for Android to sync my HTC EVO 4G to my Apples. In fact, much of this started because I was so fed-up with AT&T’s failing network I did not hesitate to jump over to Sprint and try an Android device. Thusly, the transition, or migration to other Operating Systems was really quite systematic, adventuresome and revealing.

So… The Ubuntu Operating System is pretty cool, and has become quite refined. You can’t use widely recognized email clients like Outlook or Thunderbird with it – although it comes with it’s own unique product called Evolution that is reasonably robust and packed with great applications. I’ll go into details around that some other time, maybe. And… Aside from the fact that it really does represent all things evil that are Microsoft (beginning with it’s foundation having been blatantly stolen from Steve Jobs) Windows 7 is actually pretty good. I’ve gotten accustomed to it, and I feel very comfortable.

Well… That was until I tried to use another third-party application called: syncing.net to sync my contacts, calendar events and tasks to my HTC EVO 4G. Things worked pretty well until we maxed-out our initial license (I have twelve people with about sixty PC’s and other devices) and needed to upgrade. Somewhere in the process data got crossed or corrupted and we found our computers involved with a horrific cascading event of lost data and information. All twelve of my people were stuck with contacts, calendars and other information getting erased when their newer PC’s went on-line and synced (this never happened with Apple’s).

Fortunately we had one lone PC in my own office that had not been synced for a few days. It had fairly recent information residing on it’s Outlook. Santi (yes, the very son of Raymond St. James, himself) suggested that I turn-off the office router and harvest the information from Outlook. That worked-out fairly well and we set ourselves to rebuilding other files. But, we were unsure how to sync all of our information around the world and rest assured it was safe.

It was starting to look like we might have to go with (gasp!) Microsoft Exchange – and, my people were quickly preparing to rebel against the insanity, clamoring for their Apple’s).

Out of desperation I tried Mobileme (http://support.apple.com/kb/DL769). Check it out. Do it! It comes with a Windows version (that halo effect continues to work it’s magic [read more about that here. seriously. do it now!]). I don’t know how many computers it will cover. But, for the moment, it appears to be working pretty darn well – all Apple-like.

Ironically, this means I’ve temporarily jumped off the Mac platform to Windows in an effort to expand my technology utilization horizons, and now find myself now requiring an Apple product to save my butt, and make things work.

Oh… And, I’m sure you have, collectively, followed Apple’s stock and know that it broke through three hundred and twenty dollars ($320) recently (and, thanks to the aforementioned halo effect, will continue to move North). Every day we draw closer to the Bank of brian (more about that later).

Apple always has my back.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

It’s been a rather long, tumultuous, and educational experiential journey refamiliarizing myself with the PC (as opposed to Apples), Windows – by way of the Android Operating System – and technology in the form of upheaval; the kind that requires and creates change. “Experiential” is an interesting word for the purposes of this post. The word derives it’s meaning from a learning process at the feet of old philosophers, yet it’s also apropos to a dedicated process of learning something new by, essentially, immersion. And, here we are…

Along the way, I find myself constantly reminded that we’ve become terribly reliant upon the internet for information with it being the uncertain arbiter of truth.

So… It’s become my view that the Internet, or any technology can not, will not, and should not act as a proxy to achieve the dreams and social goals we lack the courage to propose, debate, and legislate.

Thusly, I stand firm the Jeffersonian and Heterodox.

And, not often enough, we’ve discussed what being Jeffersonian means, on this Blog. However, today I’ll add some thought around what it does not mean. There will most certainly be the shaking of fists – and, furiously, that. Possibly the gnashing of teeth. Heated words, to be sure. The portent of change, inevitable.

NOTE: Don’t be overly concerned if you are reading this and come to a bound conclusion that you’ve waded, possibly unsuspecting, into my thinking mid-stream. We must all begin somewhere, and it’s how we finish, and that likely, counts for the most.

In any event, I’ll offer this abstract to maneuver you along:

It is often claimed that Internet technology will revolutionize society by privileging the small and benefiting the individual. We term the utopian tendency to hail a new communication technology as an inherently positive, decentralizing, and democratic force. In a manner of speaking this might be referred to as an example of the: “the Jeffersonian syndrome (named in honor of my hero so often appropriated to identify the decentralized, democratic outcome – the predicted triumph of the many over the few).”

It’s not just me, mind you. Others started it…

“Life in cyberspace seems to be shaping up exactly like Thomas Jefferson would have wanted: founded on the primacy of individual liberty and a commitment to pluralism, diversity, and community” (Kapor, 1993).

And,

“…the social liberalism of New Left and the economic liberalism of New Right have converged into an ambiguous dream of a hi-tech ‘Jeffersonian democracy’. Interpreted generously, this retro-futurism could be a vision of a cybernetic frontier where hi-tech artisans discover their individual self-fulfillment in either the electronic agora or the electronic marketplace” (Barbrook & Cameron, 1998).

Huh? “agora”?

Social critics dislike paucity. For example, society (that collective you), they (the social critics) complain, suffers when there are too few firms in a market, too few political choices, or too little communication. Small numbers of firms coordinate actions to stifle entry and innovation, largely at the expense of consumers. Concentration at the most extreme results in rapacious monopolies that produce inferior products at high prices. Likewise, a small number of political parties limit voter choice, stifle policy change, and produce voter apathy and special interest politics. Society would clearly be better served, so the critics argue, by greater political choice and the accompanying increased voter participation. Too little communication is also bad for society, as limited communication precludes understanding, diversity, and community.

Weep not for the minority, although, it is that collective “they” that hold most of the power, and the wealth, under many definitions, that is part of it.

Social critics often place their hopes in technology to erode the dominance of the few and foster diversity. Many view the internet as a liberating technology. Indeed, they embrace the internet as subversive, a technology that will pry power away from the few – tyrants, censors, robber barons and phone monopolies (let’s not forget Obama, Obamacrats, and that insidious media) and return it to the people. The internet, so the critics claim, will usher in a new era of perfect market competition, more direct democracy, and greater community-building (cf. Dyson, 1997). Ultimately, it will undermine the dominant few in many segments of society, and usher in a more democratic and heterogeneous political and economic system.  A system that will produce infinite consumer choice in the marketplace, deliver true democracy in the political realm, and provide unlimited and enhanced communication in the cultural realm.

This view leads to fallacious expectations about the impact of technology. And, these misguided expectations are cyclic and predictable. Corollary to this might be  a brief historical discussion of earlier communication technologies. Jeffersonian claims about the Internet are rebutted by the three propositions:

1.  New technologies do not operate in isolation from existing organizations and systems;

2.  Valuable information is never cheap; and,

3.  The economics of information markets imply concentrated structures.

And, so… The Internets non-Jeffersonian impact on economic, political, and community structures is discussed using three cases:

1.  The online market for books;

2.  The claims made about direct democracy; and,

3.  And, political parties, and the hopes for computer- mediated communities.

It’s not that I wish to promote an opposite, dystopian perspective, nor do I consider the Internet impotent in terms of societal change.

Instead, I wish to call attention to the Jeffersonian-esque view of technology as a very predictable mis-perception that is a waste of our energies.

First, as a society we must, in reasoned deliberation, conclude that we are in need of one or more of the goals we have discussed here; be it less concentrated markets, greater economic efficiency, more direct democracy, a more decentralized political system, or more participatory and emancipatory communities.

Second, after a rational analysis of our goal and the changes needed in the social, political, and economic domains to approach it (addressing also the question of if and how “the” internet has the potential to aid us in these ends).

Third, and perhaps finally, we need to advance that goal through policy.

The hype surrounding technology is also predictably old: the introduction of the PC ushered in the “PC revolution” quite simply because many analysts expected the technology to usher in just that – a revolution (a revolution of what and how the revolution was to happen was never quite specified). The hype and bluster of the internet and in particular electronic markets is thus just yet another round of new technologies and anticipated revolutions.

Think in terms of what the catapult meant to war nine hundred years ago.

These technologies have had, and may yet have, a broad range of important and far-reaching implications. The question on the table is whether these technologies will deliver on the promised Jeffersonian expectations of decentralization and democratization, or whether this revolution will yet again fail to materialize. As I’ll struggle, here, in my own inarticulate manner, to have made clear, the weight of history leads us to doubt, the present conditions in electronic commerce lead us to doubt, the claims made about direct democracy lead us to doubt, and the idolatry of the computer-mediated community lead us to doubt.

This makes me perhaps not fearful, but certainly watchful of the idyllic, sophomoric generation that sees computers and the internet as the “easy button”.

While this post has approached these domains largely using an economic perspective, I’ll grimly suspect that judicious analysis from other perspectives would also cast the Jeffersonian expectation in an unflattering light. But, stay focused on me. But, as my own Mother expounded: Question everything, and accept nothing until the truth of the day is best known.

Where the drive of the heterodox crosses paths with the passion and intellectual nuance of the Jeffersonian, you’ll find that truth in the light of the seeking heart.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

what’s all this about?

I can’t explain what that damn tree means - or, if it might stand for something.

However, here I do discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman.

brian cork by John Campbell

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"Perhaps victory can be realized best when the heart changes."

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about this particular Theme:

I'll warn you now that Tarski is theme of this blog created by Benedict Eastaugh and Chris Sternal-Johnson. It is named for the logician Alfred Tarski. I'll recommend his papers ‘The Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages’ and ‘On the Concept of Logical Consequence’, both of which can be found in the collection Logic, Semantics, Metamathematics.