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follow me boys. it’s glory or death, then.

dramatic words, to be sure.

however, we’re realizing another period in our nations history where drama and action are relevant and required. Aubrey Nelson said it first (as far as I know), but Neal Boortz repeated it – and, with great emphasis. We may well be facing the single greatest challenge to our country since the Civil War. mind you, war has a unique way of catapulting a society to another level. that can be a higher level, or a lower level.

I don’t know if shots will be fired, other than from debating floor. but, I’m convinced that change needs to be the result.

our national deficit, which means debt, may be creeping towards unprecedented levels. back when England, France and Spain were much younger as nations they also owed a lot of money so they set out to discover new territories. we may not have that option, other than Mexico. more on that later, but annexing Mexico makes a lot of economic and strategic sense.

England has committed to reducing government spending by twenty-five percent (25%) until their deficit is “manageable”. trust me, they mean it. and, few people can knuckle down better than the English. I’m married to one of them. the French on the other hand are rioting in the streets. I don’t know if it’s because they have embraced a Muslim culture, or if it’s because they can’t survive, as a people, without direct government distribution of broader fiscal management.

historically, our own (more) direct ancestors faced some tough decisions and then challenges in terms of whom they might follow – the English and/ or the French.

by the way… the French are not as self-entitled as our media would have you think. it’s mostly that they have become dependent on a government that tells it’s people what to do as opposed to leading by example.

as it turned out, from the historical rear-view mirror, we learned vital lessons from both and followed our own destiny. now Barack Obama and his total lack of both business acumen and disregard for anything other than his personal desire to stay in power, threaten everything that a Capitalist-oriented nation with appropriate oversight and checks and balances should stand for.

broad statements, I know. and, the debate, with salient details, will take better form elsewhere.

but, the question, here, is whom shall we follow? England or France?

lessons both learned and taught from my own experience with standing armies, and in business, is if you don’t like what is happening you change the rules, or you change the circumstances. so, perhaps I run the risk of being called a dissident or a heretic – depending on your historical perspective – and, think like the English or the French. but, we must needs realize change.

so… getting back to that drama… it really might be about glory or death. I am a patriot. I am also an influencer. and, I think first, and foremost like a Jeffersonian and the heterodox. let’s go ahead and toss in some Ayn Rand for good measure. Barack Obama would fear, and also hate, both of them – just like Golem despised the light (Lord of the Rings). fight the evil. let’s not be like the French and allow an insidious and ill-conceived agenda inspire rot in our culture that will disallow our children to realize what this nation was founded upon, and can be yet, in terms of a global beacon of truth and light.

I have a torch, in hand. and, I’m lighting it here. follow me boys. it’s glory, or death.

more later.

meanwhile, lets listen to “its the end of the world, as we know it” by REM (this tune never had a dedicated music video of it’s own. but, this offering is relatively apropos.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

Husky throated Patricia Neal took her last breath on Martha’s Vineyard.

But, long before she did that she managed to live life akin to a Greek tragedy. This included a series of strokes beginning at age thirty nine and the loss of a seven year old daughter to measles. However, she also inspired many with her courage and keen sense of community.

But, she also had the female lead, opposite Gary Cooper, in the 1949 film version of Ayn Rand’s novel “The Fountainhead,” and was the original Mother on the Waltons.

As many readers of this blog are well aware, Ayn Rand shaped my early life both in business and outside of it. And, I spent many an hour between college classes at Radford University and varsity sports watching The Waltons. So, that help reinforce some of my views as well. In fact, many of my fellows within the Prudent Society of Optimistic Gentlemen share that same foundation.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

High Court Justice John Paul Stevens is retiring.

And now, the stage is set for a subtle shift and the potential change for history in the making.

What’s the big deal, you ask? Well… You probably would not ask such a question – especially as we approach a weekend. But, I, on the other hand, spend endless and seemingly sleepless nights pondering implications of such things (it’s all part of being Jeffersonian, and a Prudent and Optimistic Gentleman). What is not widely understood is that Justice Anthony Kennedy, who already decides whether liberals or conservatives win the Supreme Court’s most closely contested cases, is about to take on an even more influential behind-the-scenes role.

Kennedy will inherit Stevens’ power to choose the author of some court opinions.

I am on my toes!

Why is this important, you finally ask?

The crafting of these opinions has historically been used to subtly shape a ruling or preserve what is, almost always, a tenuous majority. In fact, I feel this creative utilization of the nuance is at the very core of what Thomas Jefferson had in mind as he outlined the structure of the US Constitution – and, what it is capable of in the right minds.

For example: An unwritten high court rule gives the senior justice in the majority, most often the chief justice, the power to assign opinions.

NOTE: The overall balance of power on the court is unlikely to change, with President Barack Obama’s choice of Elena Kagan to replace the liberal-leaning Stevens. So, today, this change might keep the court’s most liberal justices from writing some of its biggest decisions. When the liberals win an ideologically driven case by, say, a 5 to 4 vote, the court’s two senior justices – currently Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Antonin Scalia, both conservatives – are sure to be on the losing side.

With Stevens gone, Kennedy is now next in line to swing opinion by assigning language to support or deny.

It’s both insidious and brilliant – and, a great example of why people refer to the nebulous “they”. This makes Kennedy potentially one of “them”.

You’ve likely read other snippets in this Blog when and where I’ll refer to something said by former Bush administration solicitor general, Paul Clement. I called him late last Friday to ask his opinion of these current events. He was quite busy with a matter related to his boat. However, he did offer that putting the power to assign opinions in Kennedy’s hands is: “…the single most important dynamic change.” brought on by Stevens’ departure.

David Garrow, a Cambridge University historian who has written about the court, said the 74-year-old Kennedy already writes a disproportionate share of the court’s big decisions and will have even more chances to do so now because he can assign opinions to himself.

Will you sleep now, reader?

This is the nexus point where the Heterodox has his day. So, look for me sustaining an opinion in this matter in the weeks and months to come. Ayn Rand would carefully alight one of her unfiltered cigarettes, fix you with a steady gaze, and then point the cigarette at you to emphasize her point that the potential for manipulating the direction of rules in a manner that disallows balanced and informed decision-making is not tolerable. And, I’m not clear this is what Thomas Jefferson had in mind. He might be spinning so fast in his grave that the earth could well remove itself from it’s axis.

But, maybe not if we remain alert.

Peace be to my Brothers and sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

Readers of this Blog understand that, from birth, I was trained to seek my wisdom and whatever fortune that might entail, through a path and study forged by logic and the classics.

This can and has included the of tilting windmills, facing that Kobayashi Maru, and honoring the face of my father by using the greatest of gifts discernment, will all my will and might.

Grandad said he could (and, he certainly did) describe me as: A superior or unusual example of a kind.

…I think that’s good.

Because I’ve lived the balance of my life trying, with all my heart and will, to earn it.

Along the way, understanding Socrates using the minds eye of Nick Pappas at Radford University with Thomas Jefferson and Ayn Rand as the lens.

Mind you… This just might help define me as an “Socalpreneur”.

A Socialpreneur is an individual who recognizes societal problems and then uses entrepreneurial skills to organize and create solutions.

Meanwhile, you might be relieved to know that I am also reading Nathaniel Philbrick’s The Last Stand. I can’t say this books is a classic. However, the story it reveals is founded in such notions, and the harbinger of inspiration. And, I’ll continue to work my way, with naught less than grim determination, and an eye for the bon mot, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

a. Belonging to the highest rank or class.
b. Serving as the established model or standard: a classic example of colonial architecture.
c. Having lasting significance or worth; enduring.
d. Adhering or conforming to established standards and principles: a classic piece of research.
b. Of a well-known type; typical: a classic mistake.
e. Of or characteristic of the literature, art, and culture of ancient Greece and Rome; classical.
f. Formal, refined, and restrained in style.
g. Simple and harmonious; elegant: the classic cut of a suit; the classic lines of a clipper ship.
h. Having historical or literary associations: classic battlefields of the Civil War.
i. An artist, author, or work generally considered to be of the highest rank or excellence, especially one of enduring significance.
j. A work recognized as definitive in its field.
k. A literary work of ancient Greece or Rome.
l. classics The languages and literature of ancient Greece and Rome. Used with the.
m. One that is of the highest rank or class: The car was a classic of automotive design.
n. A typical or traditional example.
o. Informal A superior or unusual example of its kind: The reason he gave for being late was a classic.
7. A traditional event, especially a major sporting event that is held annually: a golf classic.
or,

1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the. a body of literature regarded as great or lasting, esp that of ancient Greece or Rome

2. (Social Science / Education) the. the ancient Greek and Latin languages

3. (Social Science / Education) (functioning as singular) ancient Greek and Roman culture considered as a subject for academic study


Okay… So, finding myself immersed in the exploration of those perilous parallels between the heterodox and existentialist, I’ve decided to garnish those paradoxal thoughts with the views of the skalawag and tory.

These are fearsome days, indeed.

My spirit soars, not only with the test; but, the nurturing of soul, as I explore savor the life of a truly authentic man.

This is only a warning. Think nothing else of it, for the moment. But, I’ll likely spy you in that rearview mirror.

Mind you, I’m delighted to not be surprised, that the combination is fruitful and relevant. I can see Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Thomas Jefferson nodding to Ayn Rand above and toasting their content.

I THINK, certainly feel, this is a fair way to to honor the “face of my father”, and perhaps Dr. Nick Pappas as well.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian patrick Cork

Everyone needs to be prepared. And, I mean everyone.

I am preparing to explore the vital differences, and of course, the similarities, between the heterodox and the existentialist.

This is, at it’s very core, a formidable undertaking. A shift. Everything, what ever that may be, can or could (see: I’ve already begun to realize the existentialistic results) change.

Existentialism despite profound doctrinal differences, generally holds that the focus of philosophical thought should be to deal with the conditions of existence of the individual person and their emotions, actions, responsibilities, and thoughts. It is not some abstract set of theoretical truths. In simpler terms, it’s a no-nonsense philosophy that encourages you to take a hard look at your life and ask two essential questions: Who am I and how shall I live?

As determined readers of this Blog know, a Heterodox is that hearty and ferocious person that questions everything, and accepts little of it. We can respect the tradition, but we must challenge the foundation. The truth, of the day, is evolutionary.

So, I begin with a juxtapositional questions: Does existentialism and heterodox lead one to the other? Or, is there a vital point of integration for confluence?

Then: Is this, finally, the Kobayashi Maru? Could this be that holy grail? Is it the final application of God’s greatest of gifts to us – discernment? Is this where we find the most fertile ground for reflection and representation?

William Shakespeare, Friedrich Nitzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Ayn Rand proceed me. Thank you.

Stand by. Everything, the very fabric of the universe’s truth, is possibly at stake. The promise or the punishment. Being vulnerable and ready to change. Risking or improving one’s self.

…wait…

Perhaps you are asking, first, why I might embark on such a potentially self-indulgent journey? Well… This is something I am, at first, simply prone to do. But, it also requires that I be ready and prepared to evolve. You see… I seek ever-greater authenticity.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

We should always be celebrating something.

I have a lot to be grateful for. Oddly though, when ever I say or write something like that my mind snaps-back to Colorado. Always a filter; a constant reminder; ever, the baring point.

And, perhaps the fountainhead foundation for this post.

I have an anniversary of sorts looming.

I graduated from Radford University in May of 1984. In fact, I’ve been named a “Centennial Ambassador” with Radford’s own one-hundreth year of academic excellence at-hand. All that’s fine and dandy – and, based upon many an adventure tried-and-true. But, the significant event that made much of my college experience valid (relative to today), beyond meeting Dr. Nick Pappas, was me selling a business I ran the last two years of school.

The details are less important than the result. I was able to take care of a family, based upon a solemn pledge, which included putting the sons of another man through college themselves while caring for his widow.

Perhaps the best part, though, was me driving cross country with $300,000  in a simple plain paper bag to give my Grandad (a 6x return on his investment, mind you) back the money he grub-staked me for the business I had turned around and then sold one week after graduation.

Thomas Jefferson and Ayn Rand (The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged), long my inspirations, remain hopefully pleased and content to be represented. A foundation, if you will for my being a Prudent and Optimistic Gentleman.

May will be here before I know it. But the memories earned and lessons learned between those distinct months of May are countless, and marked by milestones of inconceivable and incalculable value.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

what’s all this about?

I can’t explain what that damn tree means - or, if it might stand for something.

However, here I do discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman.

brian cork by John Campbell

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"Perhaps victory can be realized best when the heart changes."

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I'll warn you now that Tarski is theme of this blog created by Benedict Eastaugh and Chris Sternal-Johnson. It is named for the logician Alfred Tarski. I'll recommend his papers ‘The Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages’ and ‘On the Concept of Logical Consequence’, both of which can be found in the collection Logic, Semantics, Metamathematics.