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Estimates vary widely but some credible sources think we could run out of new IP addresses as early as this February.

Go ahead and try to sleep now. I dare you.

Historically, every gizmo – PC, networked printer, IP telephone – that communicates with other gizmos over a computer network has been assigned its own, unique number (something like 172.17.60.22) called an IP address.  That identifying number is how the InterWeb knows to display this blog post on your laptop, and not on your colleague’s iPad.

Don’t panic.  This does not mean that your iPhone will stop accepting texts sometime late this winter or that you won’t be able to buy any more shiny Internet-enabled gadgets.  Network engineers are smart folk and they have foreseen this inevitability for years.  In fact, the new addressing protocol, called IPv6 (don’t ask about IPv5) was standardized way back in 1998 and allows for 2128 addresses.  That’s an unimaginably big number.  In fact, it’s enough to assign a unique Internet address to every single atom on the planet according to this web site, which provides some other amusing comparisons.

Heads-up… Keep an eye out for what Bob Twitchell and hearty and ferocious band of engineers are doing over at Dispersive Network Technologies. Sharzing is naught less than bad-ass, and wicked-cool.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

President Obama is currently on holiday in Hawaii.

And, with his ass just handed to him and his government whore minions over matters of taxation, he has apparently elected to take a few extra days and pout a bit out of the Washington, D.C. spotlight.

In the photo below, Obama is smiling because someone just told a Sarah Palin joke that he understood. See… He has a hard time understanding people that work for a living, or have actually had a real job, in life.

All that said, Obama will apparently start to fly from Hawaii on Monday evening, returning to Washington, D.C., on Tuesday afternoon, the White House just announced.

…He had discussed returning Saturday or Sunday.

But, he’s sad. He’ll likely need to call Oprah so she can tell him he really is a good example. Nobody understands him. What the politically adept Oprah would not be telling the “king with no clothes”, is that no one will understand just what a bad example he has actually become.

“After the extended lame duck and five-day delay of his trip here, he’s just trying to squeeze in more time with his family before returning to Washington,” said spokesman Bill Burton.

Evidently playing golf with Michelle and the girls stuck in the hotel is Obama’s idea of quality family time.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

So… I don’t know how many of you use LinkedIN. As it turns out, I do. And, we average two new clients a month that we can directly attribute to the business network. So, I’ll take the position it’s worth the fifty dollars we pay for the extra inMail capability.

Recently I was looking for a Subject Matter Expert (“SME”), and I found a good one on LinkedIN. But, my inMail went unanswered for several weeks until his wife, who was rummaging around on his laptop, and just happened to stumble upon the link herself, advised me that her husband was deceased. That all struck me as a bit creepy. So… It’s rather unsettling to realize that, over the course of time, more and more profiles will be a lingering memory of people that are deceased. So… You can really see dead people on LinkedIN.

In the cases of the lonely or unattached, who would know to remove the profile? Who will police that?

By the way… I was meeting with a gen-something (who really cares?) upon the request of a friend (it was his son). The young lad was twenty three and a recent graduate of Georgia. He confidently advised me that he was a social media expert (seriously). When I inquired about business context, he actually waved me off and told me that did not matter in business these days. I almost gagged on the irony (and, didn’t even need a spoon).

…oh… And, he told me LinkedIN is dead.

…he’s also unemployed, with few prospects.

…which reminds me… It’s amaz­ing how the only day most people use LinkedIN is the day they lose a job.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

This post is more about a historical footnote, of sorts. And, me showing off with corollary thinking.

Recent headlines state: Michael Vick leads Pro Bowl voting 1½ years after he was released from prison.

And, I predicted this.

Just to prove it, I’ll recommend you read my post from last season: i pick Vick – and Macbeth. That got a lot of attention. And, it was loads of fun to research and compose.

Don’t bother defying or debating me. I’ve reached a higher-plane.

According to my sources (and, those are better than yours because they come from “they”), the Philadelphia Eagles quarterback had over seven hundred and twenty nine fan votes as of last Wednesday – nearly forty thousand more than second-place Peyton Manning. Vick is going to be on a Wheaties box, soon. Manning had topped the balloting the previous two weeks before being surpassed by Vick. Actually Vick blew by him like he does most defenses – and, other people’s opinions.

It’s the latest evidence that many fans appear willing to forgive Vick for the vicious dogfighting operation (run by his white-trash family) that sent him to prison for eighteen months months as they embrace his stunning return to NFL stardom. A backup to start the season, Vick has led the Philadelphia Eagles to first place in the NFC East. along the way he’s accounted for twenty one touchdowns and throwing just two interceptions.

Just for perspective, other voting leaders include: Manning, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, and Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Online Pro Bowl voting ends Dec. 20th. The teams are picked by a combination of fans’, players’ and coaches’ votes.

I care less now about what Vick did. The worse mistake anyone can make is the one they repeat. And, I’m looking for Vick to finish well.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

JBS U14 Shockers Nation are 2010 Kohl’s Cup Champions

Sometimes we simply must set the rough-and-tumble of life aside, and just breathe (some of those times are chest-clenching gasps).

I had an awesome weekend of soccer with my daughter Haley Anne. She had one of the best tournaments of her achingly young life. And, as both a coach, and certainly a Dad, I was so proud of her. Especially in the finals wher she swept any hope of victory out of our opponents hands again, and again, and again leading the defense through four matches with only two goals against us.

We had a slow start Saturday morning losing to the Hinesville Gators (that apparently were undefeated through the regular season and the tournament with no goals against), but surged in the last fifteen minutes to set the pace for the rest of the tournament. We saw some dramatic action, and we proved that we can play and beat anybody with fantastic play from each and every player. In the finals we got that first match back against the Gators for the tournament Cup.

Thank you, and Shockers all.

NOTE: In last year’s Kohl’s Cup U14 Shockers Christy and Mars guest played for (now) sister team JBS Breakers who beat that same Hinesville Gators team in the finals. It was also that very same Gators squad that hurt (then) U14 Breakers Colette with an injured ACL. So, a JBS U14 team has won consecutive Kohl’s Cups and fought through the Gators to earn that distinction, while exacting a form of satisfaction (we should not use words like revenge or vengeance – oops, I just did!) for Colette along the way.

Brian Patrick Cork

I had this thought recently: “I could easily beat up T. S. Eliot.  He was sort of an effete, elitist, fragile weenie”.

I actually meant it.

So… I’m building off a very similar post I built late last week.

I’m a socially awkward person, and this blog helps me. I almost lost it. but, I was okay. I am somehow still connected to all of you. And, I’m a better man for it.

And, I’m grateful for so much in my life. Especially for the events surrounding, and relative to last Monday night. Only God knows.

Meanwhile, my brother Greg recently reminded me there exists a certain poem.

Have you ever read the The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock?  It’s a classic and wildly complicated poem – a meditation on aging and the aching disappointment of being human (especially male and human) – by T. S. Eliot, arguably the greatest literary observer of the first half of the (or maybe of the whole) 20th Century.

I don’t particularly have an issue with being fifty (50). I do have an issue with the human race, apparently.

I am familiar with the poem. And, it’s quite a bit about being authentic, or living the authentic life, says, or interprets, I.

Isn’t there something in it relevant to Kipling?

All men, and the women whom love them, should go find that book. Do it!

I do have many regrets. But, I’m not ready to be weary. I understand the messaging around decay, but I take that more along the lines of the moral, as opposed to temporal. There is no sense of emasculation or sexual frustration. And, I’m convinced my own immortality will have me long thumping my chest at the redoubtable Mr. Eliot (thusly, I never have an issue with speaking my mind). I’m also skeptical of anything that speaks to multiple personalities. I am who I am. And, I’m simply a dark-minded man with a willingness, if not a penchant, to put on the air of bravado.

I like the way the poem is formed though. If memory serves there are references to other literary targets (Dante, Pope Boniface VIII, Ulysses,  to name just a few of the more interesting). So, if nothing else, it’s fun by association.

Go read it. Do it!  Will the mermaids sing to you?

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

Last week, I recalled that, during my many visits to the desert (you’ll ask: “metaphorically speaking?” I’ll respond: “does it really matter?”), I met a wise man named Buck O’Neil – a prophet, if you will – and, asked him the secret to a long, successful life.

“Good genes,” was all he said, at first.

Buck left us all behind October 6, 2006 – the day before my birthday, just like Dad. There is a rhythm and pattern to life with that. But, we’ll discuss it some other time.

His hair was white and his face was mahogany, calling pleasantly to mind a pint of Guinness. “I’m ninety-years old,” he continued, then pressed his fingertips to unlined cheeks, which shone like polished apples.

“Good black don’t crack”, he mused (I’m not sure he actually mused, but that word works, here).

With that, I was fully prepared to move on, and thanked him. In fact, I was already rising halfway from my seat, like a bluffing panelist on To Tell the Truth, when he said softly: “There is one other thing.”

So, I settled back, curious, I might add, and he said:

“I never fill my stomach. My mother was a great cook, but my father told me, ‘She’s only filling your stomach so another woman never gets to. She’s just trying to hold on to you.’ Ever since, I can eat more, but I never do.”

Look… The stories around Buck are countless. Many of them will bring a tear to your eye. Others will make you slap your thigh with joy in preparation of laughter. He was a black man, and it never mattered to him, even though it did to everyone else. But, everyone respected and loved Buck (Note: That might be a vital difference between men like Buck and Barack Obama. By the way, did you know that  Obama high-tailed it to Asia, pouting over his loss of the House Tuesday? Other than a vital need to drive home a point, here, I’m loathe to include Buck in the same story as Obama. But, the only real difference Obama will make in our lives is he must now change his plans to stay in power).

Let other, more articulate folks tell those stories. Especially those that lived them alongside Buck. I never had that privilege. But, I try to learn from men like him, every day, and any way.

Part of that is my on-going efforts to live the Authentic Life. And, that includes having a life well-lived, and worth remembering by those I’ve lived amongst.

So… What, then, is the secret to a life well-lived?

Here was another hint. “Don’t hate another human being,” said O’Neil, whose father was the son of a slave. “Hate cancer. Cancer took my mother, took my wife four years ago. Hate what happened on September 11. But don’t hate another human being. God made man.”

…oh wow.

I did, in fact, find myself thinking: But God made men who denied you, at various times, a toilet, a hotel room, an education, a living, your very humanity. And, of course, I voiced those thoughts, because that’s what I do (“oh really?[!]”, you exclaim. “Brian has opinions he foists on people?”).

“My parents always told me most people are good,” continued O’Neil. “Even when I was young, (Note: he lived his early days in Carrabelle, Florida), most people were good. The thing was, good people sometimes let the bad people have their way. But who wrapped their arms around Jackie Robinson in his time of need? Pee Wee Reese of Louisville, Kentucky, did. The commissioner of baseball in 1947 [Happy Chandler] was a man from Kentucky.”

With this, his left hand grabbed my forearm, and his right fist rapped his own breastbone as if it were a door.

“It comes from in here,” said he. “Doing the right thing. It takes somebody to change something. My grandfather was a slave. And God saw it wasn’t right, so he sent Abraham Lincoln. And Abraham Lincoln joined hands with Frederick Douglass, who joined hands with Sojourner Truth, who joined hands with Harriet Tubman – and, so on.”

Apparently, and thusly, human progress, in O’Neil’s view, is a chain of men with virtu (the Greek form, mind you) in their hearts (the word virtu always has me thinking of Dr. Nick Pappas at Radford University), linked at the wrist and leading to you.

O’Neil paused, and I could only sit quietly in wonder through what must be churning through that lovely mind, and then he added:

“This is the greatest country on Earth, but we can be better. That is going to be your job.”

He held my forearm like a bat. “In my day we changed some things. Now it’s your turn to change things. And you’ll do it. I know you will.”

I did pause. And, when I confessed that I struggled, with my generation, challenged to change our channels manually, much less to change the world, he invoked the memory of his grandfather Julius, born into slavery in South Carolina, and owned by a man with the surname, O’Neil.

“Grandpa used to tell me he loved Mr. O’Neil,” he said. “And I would ask him: ‘Grandpa, how could you love a man who kept you as his slave?’ And Grandpa said, ‘He never sold off a mother from her children, he never sold off a husband from his wife.’ And Grandpa, this is before all the doctors and all the medicine we have today, lived to be one-hundred-and-two years old.”

Was this good genes, I wondered, or something greater? I was merely seeking the secret of a life well-lived – how to progress – and, felt I was getting closer. So, I asked about that. And when the old man, once again, took my arm in his hand, I felt physically linked in that chain-of-virtu to all who had gone before me…

“Love,” he half-whispered, as if sharing a confidence. “Love, man. This is the whole thing.”

So… You gotta be a “Love Kat”. It’s been awhile since I invoked that one. It’s timely to be sure.

Peace be to my brothers and sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

what’s all this about?

I can’t explain what that damn tree means - or, if it might stand for something.

However, here I do discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman.

brian cork by John Campbell

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"Perhaps victory can be realized best when the heart changes."

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about this particular Theme:

I'll warn you now that Tarski is theme of this blog created by Benedict Eastaugh and Chris Sternal-Johnson. It is named for the logician Alfred Tarski. I'll recommend his papers ‘The Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages’ and ‘On the Concept of Logical Consequence’, both of which can be found in the collection Logic, Semantics, Metamathematics.