Readers know that I’ve set aside my beloved Apple-oriented hardware (iMacs, Powerbooks, and iPhone) and have been working enthusiastically to drop the Android Operating system onto desktops. Never mind it’s already being done on a few laptops, and now tablets. I wanted a fast-starting and nimble desktop with a LARGE screen. So, being me, I set forth to make it so.

Along the way I started experimenting with different Operating Systems like Windows 7 and the Linux-leading Ubuntu (the truest form of Open Source that also works for the non-geek community).

All of this necessitated a broadening investigation into numerous applications for productivity and peripherals.

Apple was (well… is) great with everything wonderfully integrated in terms of how all your computers, iPhone, iPad, and iPod(s) can sync flawlessly (more on that in just a moment). But, I had already had to start using MissingSync for Android to sync my HTC EVO 4G to my Apples. In fact, much of this started because I was so fed-up with AT&T’s failing network I did not hesitate to jump over to Sprint and try an Android device. Thusly, the transition, or migration to other Operating Systems was really quite systematic, adventuresome and revealing.

So… The Ubuntu Operating System is pretty cool, and has become quite refined. You can’t use widely recognized email clients like Outlook or Thunderbird with it – although it comes with it’s own unique product called Evolution that is reasonably robust and packed with great applications. I’ll go into details around that some other time, maybe. And… Aside from the fact that it really does represent all things evil that are Microsoft (beginning with it’s foundation having been blatantly stolen from Steve Jobs) Windows 7 is actually pretty good. I’ve gotten accustomed to it, and I feel very comfortable.

Well… That was until I tried to use another third-party application called: syncing.net to sync my contacts, calendar events and tasks to my HTC EVO 4G. Things worked pretty well until we maxed-out our initial license (I have twelve people with about sixty PC’s and other devices) and needed to upgrade. Somewhere in the process data got crossed or corrupted and we found our computers involved with a horrific cascading event of lost data and information. All twelve of my people were stuck with contacts, calendars and other information getting erased when their newer PC’s went on-line and synced (this never happened with Apple’s).

Fortunately we had one lone PC in my own office that had not been synced for a few days. It had fairly recent information residing on it’s Outlook. Santi (yes, the very son of Raymond St. James, himself) suggested that I turn-off the office router and harvest the information from Outlook. That worked-out fairly well and we set ourselves to rebuilding other files. But, we were unsure how to sync all of our information around the world and rest assured it was safe.

It was starting to look like we might have to go with (gasp!) Microsoft Exchange – and, my people were quickly preparing to rebel against the insanity, clamoring for their Apple’s).

Out of desperation I tried Mobileme (http://support.apple.com/kb/DL769). Check it out. Do it! It comes with a Windows version (that halo effect continues to work it’s magic [read more about that here. seriously. do it now!]). I don’t know how many computers it will cover. But, for the moment, it appears to be working pretty darn well – all Apple-like.

Ironically, this means I’ve temporarily jumped off the Mac platform to Windows in an effort to expand my technology utilization horizons, and now find myself now requiring an Apple product to save my butt, and make things work.

Oh… And, I’m sure you have, collectively, followed Apple’s stock and know that it broke through three hundred and twenty dollars ($320) recently (and, thanks to the aforementioned halo effect, will continue to move North). Every day we draw closer to the Bank of brian (more about that later).

Apple always has my back.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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